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Archive for the ‘hacktivism’ Category

Stop The Impending Silence Of Net Radio!

Posted by Molli Fire on Monday, 25June07

This message is so important that I have decided to repost it with some extra information. SaveNetRadio.org has declared a Day of Silence for internet radio broadcast on Tuesday June 26th. The stations that participate will give listeners only a taste of what it will be like after July 15th if the increased royalty rate is upheld. Internet Radio Day Of Silence 2007 Stations that go silent will likely include Pandora, Live 365, Yahoo LAUNCHcast, and MTV Online, and NPR member stations. These stations, plus others like AccuRadio, Radioio, Digitally Imported, Rhapsody and many more would be seriously impacted by retroactive royalty increases equal to 50-300% of the station’s current revenue income. In Rhapsody, Pandora and Live365’s cases, the increase would also penalize their multiple channels platform, causing rate increases equal to more than 1000% of their current revenue. 1000%! According to the RAIN (Radio And Internet Newsletter):

Webcasters will be alerting their listeners that “silence” is what Internet radio may sound like on or shortly after July 15th, the day on which 17 months’ worth of retroactive royalty increase payments are due to the SoundExchange collection organization under the terms of a recent Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) decision.

Read more about the situation on the RAIN website and check out SaveNetRadio.org for more options of what you – the listener, the musician, the dj, the webcaster – can do to help.

Call Your Congress To Save Internet Radio

LINKS To Contact Your Congress

US Senators Home Page
Write Your Representatives Page

 

 

Save Net Radio - Internet Radio Day Of Silence

DO ANYTHING THAT IS WITHIN YOUR POWER TO SAVE NET RADIO!!

Please spread the word, copy and save this image and use it on your own blog. Tell all your friends. Write to the US Congress using the links above. If you can think of other ways to get involved, please share them in the comments here…

 

This report has been submitted to DIGG and Reddit. Please add your support to either.

 

Digg!

REDDIT THIS!

 

 

 

 


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Posted in +Greatest Hits+, activism, CRB, culture, dj, free, hacktivism, industry, internet, music, music tech, news, radio, social | 4 Comments »

Smaller Internet Radio Stations Get Extension On Rate Increase

Posted by Molli Fire on Tuesday, 22May07

Hurray for the dedicated supporters of internet radio broadcasting!!! We have achieved at least a small victory today, and hopefully it will serve as precedent to achieve bigger victories in the near future!

The announcement came down the vine today that SoundExchange (who i thoroughly reported about here) has offered a reduced royalty rate to “smaller” webcasters. We can only hope that this will further translate into no royalty rate for those stations that are able to prove that they do not broadcast music that incurs any royalty at all. You may recall that previous decisions had included a $500 minimum fee for every station plus royalty fees even for strictly talk-based radio. The new decision states that smaller stations on the web will owe 10% of revenues up to $250K and 12% of revenues over $250K. For stations that already pay royalties and fully comply to this system, this will come as a great relief. However, the language of the press release leads one to think that this may be a temporary fix to give smaller net stations a chance to catch up before being hit with the original plan of increased royalty rates. Let’s not even get started on how the government considers this a “subsidy” to small webcasters to help them get their business built up enough to afford the big fees, rather than a free speech or freedom of access to non-commercial music. So, the struggle to keep internet radio accessible to all has not yet been won…

Listeners Can Save Internet Radio

Please read more about the new situation by checking these links as the story progresses:

LINKS

Radio And Internet Newsletter
Save Net Radio
Hypebot

PBS report on the dynamics of webcasting.

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Posted in +Greatest Hits+, activism, CRB, DIY, dj, hacktivism, industry, internet, legal, music, music tech, news, piracy, radio, social | Leave a Comment »

Digg Community Digs Grave For Digg

Posted by Molli Fire on Thursday, 3May07

Undertaker, build me a coffin.  No, no, no, make that 2.  One for the selector blogger, one for the mourner Digger…

digg-guy.png

The biggest story on the web today concerns a user revolt on the popular bookmark site, Digg. It started when somebody published a hack code that removes the copy-protection from HD DVDs. Naturally, this became big news and was a top post on Digg among many other bookmark sites. According to Digg staff member, Jay Adelson :

We’ve been notified by the owners of this intellectual property that they believe the posting of the encryption key infringes their intellectual property rights.

Digg then proceeded to delete the posts that contained the hack code, and suspend the members who posted it. As it turns out, the community who participates in Digg, without which Digg would not exist, being that it is a social bookmarking site decided to make it crystal clear who decides the news. Digg was bombarded with posts that contained the code, and had to make a decision – wholesale deletion and suspension, or give in to the masses. i’ll let Digg’s founder, Kevin Rose tell you what they did :

In building and shaping the site I’ve always tried to stay as hands on as possible. We’ve always given site moderation (digging/burying) power to the community. Occasionally we step in to remove stories that violate our terms of use (eg. linking to pornography, illegal downloads, racial hate sites, etc.). So today was a difficult day for us. We had to decide whether to remove stories containing a single code based on a cease and desist declaration. We had to make a call, and in our desire to avoid a scenario where Digg would be interrupted or shut down, we decided to comply and remove the stories with the code.

But now, after seeing hundreds of stories and reading thousands of comments, you’ve made it clear. You’d rather see Digg go down fighting than bow down to a bigger company. We hear you, and effective immediately we won’t delete stories or comments containing the code and will deal with whatever the consequences might be.

If we lose, then what the hell, at least we died trying.

Digg on,

Kevin

There you have it. The power of the people always wins when they unite to overwhelm the system. Of course, it helps if it is a system that you actually want to destroy. Personally, i always thought that Digg was corrupt. It has been pretty well documented that the system is rigged.

Viva La Revolucion!

personally, i’m just too anti-social to get that involved in social bookmarking. this blog has been a big leap for me. don’t get me wrong, i have a great circle of friends who are amazing, and we organize shows, play music, and all that, so i guess i’m social…. it’s the networking i don’t really get into much….

Posted in DIY, hacktivism, internet, legal, piracy, social, technology | Leave a Comment »

Hacking The Social Network To Get To The Top

Posted by Molli Fire on Monday, 30April07

Before I end the detour into posting about HearingTest and internet technical info, I want to add a few things….

This Here WordPress Blog

I like to read about all kinds of things and i’m fascinated with how things work. I have a terrible habit of dismantling things, especially electronic things, to see how they work. If they weren’t broken to begin with, I am good at getting them back together. One of my many obstacles in life turns up when I take things apart that don’t work for some reason. I leave them “exploded” – scattered bits about 1/16th inch away from where they were nestled together as a cohesive whole. I leave them that way while I try to find the part that will make them work again. This would be fine, except they tend to multiply. Many little unfinished projects with their guts exposed.

I can’t do this with the web. If something can’t be fixed properly, I have to figure out a backup plan that will work. Which brings us to the current design and layout going on here at the HearingTest HQ. WordPress worked on fixing the sidebar/widget problems this morning, and seems to have resolved it. For some reason, it’s not working for me. I have a dead widgets dashboard. I can’t mess with ’em. So what am i going to do now?

(shrugs) nothing.

It really doesn’t bother me too much, as long as all the correct info is there. I’d actually like this layout if the sidebars were on the left. And, i wanted to change the CSS for this site soon enuff anyway. So, maybe this will do until I get a chance to write up a stylesheet, it might increase my motivation to get on that. Or, maybe i will figure out how to get the old design working again. Either way, it means there will be a bit of a construction zone goin on here for a short time. I apologize, I hope no one is actually inconvenienced, though i hardly think a person could be inconvenienced by this site.

Technorati favorites, Digg, Top blogs, And other Social Networking Issues In Web 2.0

I’m A Tinkerer

Part of my fascination with how things work extends to the web. I learned programming at a very early age – I was writing programs on a Commodore 64 that would tutor me on french when I was about 12 – so I am intrigued with SEO, accessibility, user interface, and such things. This is one of the reasons I thoroughly enjoy reading Problogger, even though i have almost no interest in making money from the blog itself. Sure, i have that link to Threadless Tshirts in the sidebar, which generates a whopping $3 credit in the store for me if someone were to use that link AND buy a shirt. (have you seen that link? oh you really should, it’s near the bottom. have you seen Threadless Tshirts? They are SO nice!) ;) But i digress. I read Problogger because I find it interesting. It’s useful, often has specific info on topics that are of interest to any website manager, and I like that he values reader interaction and quality of content more than what the web-surfing robots think. You know, the robots who decide things like blog rank and top posts and such.

Technorati Favorite Swapping

This weekend, I learned of yet another web 2.0 obsession – swapping favorite blog links. It is a game that some people play to get ahead on the web. The idea is to get enough people to add your blog address to their favorite blogs list on Technorati so that you get into the Top 100 Favorited Blogs. Darren, the author of Problogger, wrote a post about the dynamics of this game and whether being in the top 100 was a huge advantage or not. He has a great perspective in this matter, being #3 on the list, and it is valuable to get a glimpse of what he can see from there. Especially because he does not use this swapping method to get ahead in the rank. His post got me thinking about such methods, and I just thought I would put them here for the record. Think of this as an editorial in the Opinion section…

Put Down The Mouse, It’s Time To Get Some Fresh Air

Towards the end of that post, Darren offered up his honest opinion of the tactic. He said “This might not be popular – but I think that the practice of swapping favorites is a little sad and that the energy that some bloggers are putting into doing it could be much better spent by actually engaging with readers and encouraging genuine relationships to be formed.” I couldn’t agree more. The funny thing is that some people got really upset. Some even went so far as to use expletives in their comments! Getting heated about a topic like this displays how some people identify themselves with their blogs too much. MANY people in this cyber world need to step away from their computers and get some air. And some perspective. Take a walk, or a vacation. Seriously, it’s a blog, a web log of some series of events and personal experiences. Blogs may be taking over the web, but they should not be allowed to take over our lives. I say this even as someone who has spent 16 hours/day on my laptop every day for the last 2 weeks. I have not had any day off, I have been eating pizza and chinese, drinking too much coffee, and going insane. However, this is really unusual for me. I love the outside world, I love dancing and kung fu, I love huge stacks of speakers playing dub music, I especially love fresh air!

Every Man And Woman Is A Star

Blogs, writing, coding, programming, designing, and all computer based careers cause pixel burn to the eyes, a lack of social skills, stiff joints, sore backs, and a host of other problems. Why would i want to identify with these things? I find it a little scary that we, as an online population are getting so involved in web 2.0 that some people are beginning to internalize their online personas. Granted, your blog is a personal experience, and it probably follows the same moral standards that you adhere to in “real” life. But really, why take it so seriously?
I can appreciate the spirit of experimentation that this game began with (supposedly), but these types of trading, gaming, etc. is really just cheating. Is it more important to see inflated stats, rather than have any clue if someone actually likes the work being presented? For some, I suppose it is. But in the end, it’s just an illusion. I’d rather have one genuine reader than 100 fake ones. At least I would know if I was blogging to a brick wall in cyberspace. Plus, I hate it when a good idea, and a useful tool gets ruined by people who abuse it and exploit it, thereby making the tool completely inaccurate and useless. Well, for me, and my web persona, we’re gonna stick with integrity and moral highground. Even if it means we look insignificant in the vast universe of the www. Coz we are, we’re VERY insignificant. So is almost everything I post here. Do you think I would care about anything at all on the web if I was hungry from not eating enough for a week? How about a month? A year? Do you think our great great grandchildren will care about how popular our stupid blog was? Maybe it would be better to leave them a healthy environment, or an inspiring educational system.

End : rant transmission

Thanks for reading through all that. I don’t often rant and I’m not sure what has inspired this sudden interest in interacting with fellow bloggers. Today I even found myself going back to the WordPress forum about the broken sidebars and posting the temporary solution that had worked for me. I went back, and shared my insight in the hopes others could benefit as well from my discovery. This is totally my style, but not usually my web style. I hope I haven’t been virtually bit by a link swapping, black hat, blogger vampire!

Take it slow,
miss iVi

Posted in +Greatest Hits+, design, experimental, hacktivism, HearingTest updates, internet, piracy, social, technology, wordpress | Leave a Comment »

New Bill In House Hopes To Save Internet Radio Broadcasting

Posted by Molli Fire on Friday, 27April07

Radio And Internet Newsletter aka RAIN reports today that a bill has been introduced into the house by Representative Jay Inslee (D-WA) that shows hope for indpendent internet radio broadcasting. It is titled The Internet Radio Equality Act and covers the following aspects :

The bill has five major provisions:

  1. Nullifies the recent decision of the CRB judges
  2. Changes the royalty rate-setting standard that applies to Internet radio royalty arbitrations in the future so that it is the same standard that applies to satellite radio royalty arbitrations — the 801(b)(1) standard that balances the needs of copyright owners, copyright users, and the public (rather than “willing buyer / willing seller”). (For more detail on this point, read the recent RAIN issue on “Copyright law,” here.)
  3. Instructs future CRBs that the minimum annual royalty per service may be set no higher than $500.
  4. Establishes a “transitional” royalty rate, until the 2011-15 CRB hearing is held, of either .33 cents per listener hour, or 7.5% of annual revenues, as selected by the provider for that year. Those rates would be applied retroactively to January 1, 2006. (The logic behind this rate, incidentally, is an attempt to match the royalty rate that satellite radio pays for this royalty — thus the name of the bill.)
  5. Expands the Copyright Act’s Section 118 musical work license for noncommercial webcasters to enable noncomms to also perform sound recordings over Internet radio at royalty rates designed for noncommercial entities, and sets an transition royalty at 150% of the royalty amount paid by each webcaster in 2004. (Note that this amount would be a set, flat fee through the end of the decade.)

For future CRBs (e.g., 2011-15), adds three new reports in the CRB process: The Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information will submit a report to the CRB judges on the industry impact in terms of competitiveness of the judges’ proposed rates; at the same time, the FCC will submit a report to the CRB judges on the effects of the judges’ proposed rates on localism, diversity of programming, and competitive barriers to entry; and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting will submit a report to Congress and the CRB judges on the effect of the the judges’ proposed rates on their licencees.

RAIN’s webpage is much more informative, as it has links sprinkled throughout these provisions. RAIN also points out :

Now that the bill has been introduced, the SaveNetRadio.org “call to action” is specific and direct: The site is now asking listeners to call their Representative and ask him/her to “cosponsor the Internet Radio Equality Act, introduced by Representative Jay Inslee.” Once listeners click the “Call Your Representatives” button on the site and enter their zip code, they are given their Representative’s House office phone number and a list of “talking points” to emphasize.

Please click over to RAIN’s webpage for more information. They have a pdf version of the entire Act, as well as more coverage and suggestions for how you can participate.

One thing you can do is call your Representatives and urge them to co-sponsor the Internet Radio Equality Act. Hit Save Net Radio to get your Rep’s phone number.

International Listeners

If you reside outside the US (lucky you!) you can still help keep internet radio from being crushed by this BS. Join SaveNetRadio’s coalition! Click Coalition to find out how.

 

 

SaveNetRadio.org

MORE LINKS

http://www.savenetradio.org/index.html
http://www.kurthanson.com/

Posted in +Greatest Hits+, activism, CRB, DIY, dj, free, hacktivism, internet, legal, music, music tech, news, piracy, radio, RIAA, social, technology | Leave a Comment »

CRB Upholds High Fees For Internet Radio

Posted by Molli Fire on Monday, 16April07

The CRB decided earlier today to keep their decision pertaining to increased royalty rates for internet radio broadcasters. i have included the entire press release here in order to give you as much information as possible. the press release is from Sound Exchange and i found it on hypebot

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
APRIL 16, 2007

Judges Rule No Change In Music Royalty Rates

-Increased Fees From Internet Radio Upheld-

Washington, DC—The Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) today upheld its earlier decision on fair royalty rates to be paid to musical artists and record labels for the use of their work on Internet radio. The three judge panel denied motions by Internet radio operators for a rehearing of the Board’s March 1, 2007 decision setting performance royalty rates for Internet radio from 2006 to 2010.

The CRB wrote in its decision, “…none of the moving parties have made a sufficient showing of new evidence or clear error or manifest injustice that would warrant rehearing. To the contrary…most of the parties’ arguments in support of a rehearing or reconsideration merely restate arguments that were made or evidence that was presented during the proceeding.”

SoundExchange Executive Director John Simson declared that this is a victory for performing artists and record labels who work long and hard to produce music for all to enjoy. “Our artists and labels look forward to working with the Internet Radio industry — large and small, commercial and non-commercial — so that together we can ensure it succeeds as a place where great music is available to music lovers of all genres,”said Simson

“AFTRA recording artists applaud the Copyright Royalty Board for upholding their decision on internet radio,” said Kim Roberts Hedgpeth, National Executive Director of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA). “They deserve to be paid fairly for the use of the creativity, talent, and hard work they put into making music. Internet radio is growing and successful because fans want to listen to the music created by artists. The CRB’s decision recognizes that, as these businesses grow, both featured and non-featured artists should be compensated at fair market rates for their contributions to the growth of these companies.”

The CRB also wrote, “…it appears that all evidence discussed in the motions had either been discovered during the proceeding or could have been discovered during the proceeding, with reasonable diligence.” Additionally, the CRB found: “In the absence of an adequate showing of new evidence, the parties’ arguments in their respective motions amount to nothing more than a rehash of the arguments that the Judges considered in the Initial Determination.”

Michael Huppe, General Counsel of SoundExchange, in noting that SoundExchange is now looking forward to the next steps in the wake of the CRB ruling, said, “We are gratified that the CRB has upheld its decision. With the resolution of these motions, it is now time to move forward with business. It’s in everyone’s best interest to ensure a vibrant and thriving marketplace for Internet Radio and we intend to work with webcasters towards achieving that goal.”

Additionally, the CRB denied the request of webcasters to stay implementation of the new royalty rates (2006-2010) until all legal appeals had been exhausted. In doing so, the CRB pointed to specific language established by Congress in the Copyright Act. The CRB wrote, “…Congress, not the Judges determined the effective dates for the royalty rates…” The CRB went on, “Moreover Congress determined that these rates would go into effect, notwithstanding any pending motions for rehearing..”
Barry Bergman, President of the Music Managers Forum-US aid, “For many artists a royalty check can mean the difference between continuing to create new and exciting music for a living, or allowing musical talents to be silenced. In recognizing the value musical artists bring to the success of Internet radio, the CRB has taken a necessary step in helping to ensure that many artists are able to continue using their special talents which are enjoyed by all.”

The CRB also made two points of clarification regarding its Initial Decision. First, at the request of the webcasters, the CRB will allow them to use estimated ATH (Aggregate Tuning Hours) measures to determine audience listening for 2006 and 2007. However, the CRB said this is only for a transitional period, during which webcasters who have not yet implemented systems to track the music that they play will have the chance to do so.

Also, in response to SoundExchange’s request for clarification, regarding whether the Initial Decision covers webcasting services delivered over cellular networks, the CRB indicated it did.

Background
On March 2, 2007, the Copyright Royalty Board issued a fair and reasonable decision that sets compensation rates to be paid artists and record labels for the public performance of their works by Internet radio broadcasters from 2006-2010. The three judge panel heard testimony from dozens of witnesses and conducted a comprehensive review of tens of thousands of pages of evidence submitted by all interested parties over an 18-month period. The decision is a reflection of the need for artists to be fairly compensated for the performance of their work by webcasters who benefit–financially or otherwise–from their talents. As the music industry evolves from CD-only sales to multiple distribution platforms it is critical that creators of music share in revenues from all platforms.

SoundExchange is the first performance rights organization in the United States to collect and distribute digital audio transmission royalties to artists and sound recording copyright owners. SoundExchange represents over 2000 record companies and thousands of recording artists, and is seeking out more labels and artists who are owed royalties for sound recordings played on digital cable and satellite television music services, satellite radio services or streamed via non-interactive webcast. The non-profit organization is governed by a board of artist and label representatives. Services include track level accounting of performances to all members and collection and distribution of foreign royalties to all members. All artists, labels and/or their representatives are invited to visit http://www.soundexchange.com.

Posted in +Greatest Hits+, activism, dj, hacktivism, internet, legal, music, news, piracy, radio, RIAA | 1 Comment »

How To Live DRM Free In The Digital Age

Posted by Molli Fire on Wednesday, 21March07

Living DRM Free In The Digital Age

Is it possible? It depends on what you do as an individual, and what the manufacturers do with the technology that they make available to the public. You, as an individual, have a say in both cases. The first step needs to be taken immediately, while the second step will improve your stride into the future! Here is a new, more organized installment of “a very detailed report” about what is happening this week with digital media – storage, streaming and sharing as well as some resources for DRM free music experiences. (Feel free to read my previous installment, which is long in the tooth, but pretty widely peppered with links for lots more information about the CRB’s drastic increase in royalty rates for webcasters. You can find it in the archive on March 7th.)

First, if you are not familiar with DRM and its issues, start by reading the Wiki entry for DRM which is thorough in its portrayal of the different opinions and motivations that have polarized the music community.
Next, read Steve Jobs’ “Thoughts On Music” on apple.com which has been a hot topic since its publication February 6th 2007. Jobs basically dumbs down the history of Apple’s involvement with the music distribution companies, explains how hackers are smart enough to crack any protection they implement, forcing Apple programmers to keep up an endless game of “cat and mouse” with hackers in order to keep the big music companies docile enough to not yank its entire catalog from the iTunes Store.

– -if you want to know the punchline from these thoughts right now, then keep reading this section. otherwise skip past the brackets and read the manifesto in full on apple.com- –

[- – SPOILER WARNING – – Jobs outlines 3 options for dealing with DRM, choose one : “The third alternative is to abolish DRMs entirely. … This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. …” But then he ends the lesson by leaving this option in the hands of the Big 4 and the EU. It’s too bad he did not make a more clear statement of intent for making changes to Apple’s software and hardware, nor the imposed DRM on tunes and movies that are not under the authority of the Big Boys….]

In the interest of counterpoint, i’d like to know how Apple and Steve Jobs would benefit or be compromised by opening up the DRM restraints. Would it ease legal difficulties arising in courts in EU countries? Would it eliminate obstacles to launching the iPhone with full online and streaming capabilities? Are we to believe that Steve Jobs is a man of the people, and making this statement as a champion of the consumers?

This time last year, CNN reported in their Money section :

The companies – Universal, Warner Music (Research), EMI and Sony BMG – were forced to accept Apple CEO Steve Jobs’ pricing because the iTunes music store has so much influence over the U.S. download market, the report said. The iTunes music store accounts for 80 percent of paid downloads.

The newspaper says that some labels were considering signing short-term contracts with Apple now and then bringing up the issue again in the near future.

Wow, that’s a lot of influence our man Steve Jobs has. If he has this kind of sway over the market and the big music companies, then it seems he would be able to make option 3 in his statement a reality : a DRM free industry, where all media players can play the music that we purchase in all of our listening environments. No more cds bought from best buy that can’t be ripped to play in the car. No more tunes purchased from online stores that cannot be played in mp3 players not made by Apple. Freedom from restrictive micro-management.

How do we the people, who gave Steve Jobs that kind of clout by purchasing 80% of all our downloads from the iTunes Store with millions of our hard earned dollars, let him know that we want DRM free music.? How do we push him into championing the cause of the consumer and putting his ideas into concrete action? It’s simple, and realistic, and it involves those 2 steps i mentioned at the beginning of this episode. First, we tell Steve Jobs that we like his ideas and we want them to become reality. Second, we use our dollars as voting power, and only purchase music that is distributed without DRM. Believe it or not, both steps are very easy, and most likely will not restrict your musical experience at all.

NOW – –*right now*– – If you want to show your support for a DRM free experience and urge Steve Jobs and Apple to lead the way out of DRM and its Digital Restrictions Mafia, then add your signature to the “Open Letter to Steve Jobs” on the Defective By Design website. The letter simply urges him to back up his online pledge with reasonable action, specifically by opening the DRM for all media in the iTunes Store that does not require this impairment. This would cover giving independent musicians and labels the option to decline DRM restrictions being added to their files on iTunes, as well as opening DRM from other products that are not required to use DRM. Jobs also has the authority and corporate standing as a member of Disney’s Board of Directors to have the DRM dropped from Disney’s movies and videos sold in the iTunes Store.

Now for the 2nd step : Starting right now, you can begin living a life free from DRM. you probably won’t want to ditch all the DRM music that you already have and enjoy listening to, but you can make concious choices about the music that you purchase in the future. So much of the music we listen to today will be out of regular rotation in our playlists a year or 2 from now ayway. Making choices about music now could actually convert more and more of our playlists to be free of restrictions. Defective By Design features an online guide to DRM-free Living. The guide features links to record labels, online music stores, software, players and more that provide digital music to the public without the restrictive DRM.
This is where i cheer and jump for joy – Yay!!! Because, there are some great stores on this list that i already frequent, and have been posting links to for you to listen to the great music that i have been writing about! Not only do i vouch for some of these sites, i highly encourage you to go check out their selection! Bleep.com is on there, a great online store for electronic music (Warp Records, Traum, Ed Banger), hip hop and dj music (Ninja Tunes, XL), blues and reggae (Birdman, Trojan) and much much more. The store is vast, and nearly every song on every album has a preview clip to listen to. And yep – eMusic.com and Canada’s Nettwerk is on there as well. When you are checking out this amazing guide, don’t miss page two, because that’s where you will find the link to DRM-free streaming videos like the Decemberists and Postal Service, as well as internet tv and video podcasts.
Oh, and speaking of defective design, many links in the guide were not working for me! but, i was able to locate every website address by hovering over either the site name or the tag name, reading the address and typing it by hand in the location bar. hopefully DbD will have that fixed soon.

Whew! There you have it, an exhaustive report on how to survive as a music lover in the age of music restriction. Consider this your bootleg bottle of prohibition digital music information! i hope you enjoyed the read, and found it helpful. i imagine there will probably be another installment next week, when the industry announces more ways to steal our money.

Posted in +Greatest Hits+, activism, DRM, hacktivism, internet, legal, mp3, music, music tech, news, piracy, RIAA, social, technology, writ | 1 Comment »