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Archive for the ‘radio’ Category

Neko Case DJs April 8

Posted by Molli Fire on Wednesday, 21March07

neko case

According to :: ANTI :: Neko Case will be dj’ing on the sirius radio show :: Outlaw Country ::

It airs April 8th twice, first at 9am and again at midnight on channel 63. Those are ET times which is (-5 GMT) for the rest of the world.

ANTI also has a nice :: bio page :: for the lovely lady.

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Posted in dj, internet, music, news, radio, shows | Leave a Comment »

Grime Explosion From UK To You

Posted by Molli Fire on Wednesday, 21March07

What happened last weekend in Bow, or in the rest of UK for that matter? News from that neighborhood is exploding on Pitchfork this week with new releases from Dizzee Rascal, Wiley, Roll Deep, and Joker! i can’t even type fast enough to properly share all the details with you, but i will give it a go, because this sound is hot!

For starters, i have already posted news about Dizzee Rascal’s collaborations with the Arctic Monkeys, Joss Stone, and Lily Allen. Dizzee’s new album is set to drop the same day as Wiley’s latest, and maybe last, solo album. Wiley is the frontman for the self-produced crew of djs, producers, and mc’s known as Roll Deep, of which Dizzee used to ride with. Roll Deep announced yesterday that they will be releasing their Rules & Regulations Vol. 1 on their own label, Roll Deep Recordings. That story is here.

Today Pitchfork published their monthly feature, The Month In: Grime/Dubstep which, this month, exposes grime’s wide reaching influence from UK to NYC to SF. Here are some of the highlights :

Joker, with an album already out on the label, Earwax, and another one on the way on Terrorhythm soon, is bringing a unique video game sound to a genre that has been based largely on smooth rolling drum and synth sounds. He’s been surrounded by some of UK’s hottest and most talented beat producers and mcs, so expect this kid to rise quickly to the spotlight. Also, being so heavily influenced by the grime, dubstep and garage music that has been gaining popularity over the last 5 years, he’s steppin out with a unique interpretation of what other producers have done, sometimes to the point of scrapping the elements thought to be key to the sound. And it still works. He ends up with a new sound that is still very much grime music.

The feature also has lots of good background on the developments in the UK grime scene that has brought some artists into the spotlight, while hiding others away, sometimes by drama and changing allegiances within the music scene, some tangled with the law and lost a lot of time in the studio and served time instead.
But wait, it gets even better! I don’t fully understand why the article suddenly veers over to the US to discuss the budding grime, dubstep, ragga, and dancehall scene, but it mentions 2 crews organizing parties based on this slow, bass heavy sound, one in San Francisco and one in NYC. Reppin the SF side of things, Kid Kameleon not only perfectly sums up the diversity in the music styles, the djs and producers backgrounds, but also with the crowds attending events such as the ones organized by Surya Dub at Club 6 in downtown SF. When you get that far into the article, watch your toes because Kid Kameleon starts droppin names like a B52! Kid Kameleon and Dj Ripley have both participated in the underground soundsystem culture that has been strong in NYC and SF for the last 10 years, as well as making names for themselves around the world, touring with DrumCorps/Aaron Spectre, DJ C of the MashIt ragga jungle/breakcore record label, and Kid 606 of the ragga jungle/breakcore/techno/electronica record labels Tigerbeat6 and Shockout.

And i can’t forget to mention BBC radio, who has been open to these ghetto sounds for quite some time now, and has been very influential in streaming it to an international audience. BBC radio has stations dedicated to playing the current sounds of whats happening in UK studios and on its streets, and is playing a big role in the global interest. there are other stations like RinseFM that are more in touch with the producers, mcs, and djs that have hosted night after night after night of live performances and then immediately posting whole sets online for people everywhere to enjoy for free. But, ever since Barefiles.com disappeared, and some drama has ensued, it has become difficult for anyone outside of the UK to have access to what is current in the scene. So, BBC is the place to watch and listen, even if it’s more due to their staying power than actual credibility.

However, this week they had some very influential and credible artists in the studio, hosting shows, playing music, talking about what’s happening right now, and these shows are not to be missed. BBC archives each show for one week only, so don’t sleep on this!!

BBC 1xtra had Skepta and his mum on the DJ Target show on sunday for UK’s Mother’s Day. We even got to hear him perform his new song, “Sweet Mother”, live on air! That show is here.

On April 21, Roll Deep will be in the studio performing live on Tim Westwood’s show. That link is here.

i think there are actually a few others that i should be posting here, but i’ll have to dig them up. i’ll add them right here, check back tomorrow to see if i found anything.

Posted in +Greatest Hits+, bass, dubstep, electronica, grime, hip hop, music, new release, news, NYC, radio, SF, shows, UK, vinyl, writ | Leave a Comment »

NPR and CPB plan legal action to overturn raised royalties

Posted by Molli Fire on Monday, 12March07

“Lawyers for National Public Radio (NPR) and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) are in Washington this week, planning legal action aimed at overturning a ruling from US Copyright Royalty Judges which raised royalty fees for webcasters high enough for some to predict the demise of Internet radio.”

The full article is here.

Posted in internet, legal, music, news, piracy, radio | Leave a Comment »

A detailed report on the Battle Between Webcasters and the CopyrightRoyaltyBoard

Posted by Molli Fire on Wednesday, 7March07

randall munroe
comic by Randall Munroe

I posted last week about internet broadcasters (webcasters) being charged royalty fees, including retroactively for all of 2006, when the US Copyright Royalty Board announced its decision on the new rates. (See here for that post) Given the obscene nature of these fees : enforced retroactively AND costing 2-5 times more what most stations were able to earn through listener support and advertising, the online community and the legal defense parties are leaping into action, first with an appeal, and simultaneously with awareness and support from people who don’t want to lose internet radio stations.

One internet radio station that will be dramatically affected by this new royalty rate is SomaFM from San Francisco, CA. They are a poster child for the small radio station that played by the rules, but might be forced to shut down due to the enormous disparity between what a station is capable of earning, and what it is expected to pay to all the different music management and licensing companies. SomaFM relates the details of their situation in the latest newsletter :

You may have heard, but once again internet radio is facing huge additional royalties for broadcasting music. These royalties are in addition to the ones that we pay to ASCAP and BMI, and are a royalty that is only paid by internet broadcasters. Over-the-air (AM/FM) broadcasters are explicitly exempt from this royalty; it only applies to internet broadcasters and subscription music services. In the past, we paid royalties based on a percentage of our revenues, in our case 10% of our revenue. But the new royalties don’t allow that percentage of revenue factor, and instead charge us for each song we play times the number of people listening. This works out to about $8 per average concurrent listener per month. In 2006, we averaged over 6000 average concurrent listeners per month, and the royalties we will have to pay for 2006 is about $628,000, over 4 times the amount of money we brought in. And these rates go up drastically each year, until 2010, where they are 2.5 times their initial rate: by then we will have to pay over $1 million dollars a year in royalties if we want to stay on the air. So you can see that this puts us in an impossible position. And to make it even worse, the rates are retroactive to 2006. It doesn’t seem fair that a small radio service like SomaFM has to pay all these additional royalties, when over-the-air stations who reach much larger audiences are exempted from paying them. If you are in the USA, we would appreciate it if you could sign this online petition which will be presented to members of Congress.It’s important for us to let Congress know that independent internet radio is about to be forced out of business. We need to keep our existing “percentage of revenue” royalty rate structure, or better yet, have Congress extend the exemption to internet radio stations as well as terrestrial (over-the-air) stations.

http://www.petitiononline.com/SIR2007r/petition.html

Thanks for all of your support for SomaFM in the past. We will do what we need to do to keep SomaFM on the air and broadcasting. We love you!

Rusty Hodge,
General Manager and Program Director
SomaFM.com

For more information on SomaFM, visit their website : http://somafm.com

This petition is the big deal right now. The website “Save Our Internet Radio” has a page with 6 things you can do to help webcasters in this daunting legal battle, and this petition is at the top of the list.

Mad as hell about the threat to Internet Radio? Do Something!

Posted by
Bill Goldsmith

1. Sign this online petition and open letter to the US Congress.

2. Send an email to your members of Congress. You can use our suggested text, or write your own.

3. Print out the email (you’ll get a copy) and mail it to your Congresspeople. Follow up with a phone call. You can look up their addresses and phone numbers here.

4. Write a letter to the editor of your favorite magazines and newspapers. If you know someone in the media, let them know what’s going on. Have them read my post below, if you like.

5. Don’t panic. Together we can save the medium that we all love. We have the passion to make it happen!

6. Digg this post to help spread the word.

In order to digg that post, you will have to go to the post itself. Just click on the headline, or the word permalink in the quoted text.

Another thing to consider, since Congress is a bit slow to action, is contacting the Copyright Royalty Board directly. Let them know exactly how you feel about this decision, how it affects you personally, and how it affects the existance of internet radio. Let them see that killing this industry may make royalties harder to collect in the future, not only because so many stations went out of business, but also because we, the public, aren’t being exposed to new artists and new music, and therefore are not buying as many albums as we did when we heard it first on internet radio. You can contact the CRB directly at :

Copyright Royalty Board
P.O. Box 70977
Washington DC 20024-0977

(202) 707-7658

Or use the online form on their website : http://www.loc.gov/crb/contact/

For what it’s worth, many organizations, government agencies, and lobbyists count each form of communication as representing more than one person’s opinion. The formula for this type of math counts letters as representing more people than phone calls, which in turn represent more than emails. Doing all 3 counts the most!

Even Wired Magazine is abuzz with updates on the battle between broadcasters and the Board. Today their headlines included :

Royalty Hike Panics Webcasters
08:00 AM Mar, 06, 2007
By Eliot Van Buskirk

Internet radio companies big and small are revving up for a fight with the Copyright Royalty Board that could lead to the halls of Congress and — some fear — the end of streaming music stations in the United States.

The panicked preparation follows last Friday’s buzz-killing bombshell: As 50 million or so online radio listeners geared up for their weekends, the board released new royalty rates representing a potential tenfold increase webcasters would have to pay out.

In the old, percentage-based fee system, webcasters paid SoundExchange — the Recording Industry Association of America-associated organization that pushed the Copyright Royalty Board to adopt the new rates — between 6 percent and 12 percent of their revenue, depending on audience reach. The new system charges all webcasters a flat fee per song per listener; for instance, in 2007, streaming companies would owe $0.0011 per song per listener (rates change based on year).

That amount may not sound like much, but it adds up quickly. Consider, for instance, AOL Music, with its average of 210,694 listeners for November 2006. According to calculations made by the Radio and Internet Newsletter, or RAIN, AOL retroactively owes about $1.65 million in sound-recording royalties for that month alone (and that doesn’t include songwriting royalties). By the end of this year, according to RAIN, the company could owe roughly $20 million — unless the rates are overturned by the board or by Congress, which is still a possibility.

Larger services that offer thousands of channels, such as the free Pandora, are also facing a huge spike in royalty costs. Kurt Hanson, publisher of RAIN and CEO of AccuRadio, went so far as to speculate that Pandora, which is based in the United States, could “disappear” as a result of the new rates. Overseas competitors like Last.fm, which is based in London and removed from the board’s restrictions, could easily claim Pandora’s market share. If Pandora has to pay the annual $500 minimum for each channel, Hanson said, its sound-recording royalty bill for 2006 alone would be capped at about $2 billion (based on the service’s 300 million registered users, each of whom gets to create up to 100 unique channels).

“The rates are disastrous,” says Joe Kennedy, CEO of Pandora. “I’m not aware of any internet radio service that believes it can sustain a business at the rates set by this decision.”

The situation for smaller webcasters isn’t any better. And for the likes of Bill Goldsmith, who runs Radio Paradise, it’s far worse: “This royalty structure would wipe out an entire class of business, small independent webcasters such as myself and my wife. Our obligation under this rate structure would be equal to over 125 percent of our total income.”

The smallest webcasters, who use services such as Live365 for their shows, will likely vanish as well unless the rates are overturned. RAIN pegs Live365’s royalty obligation for 2006 at approximately $4.2 million — and that’s not counting the minimum $500 it could owe annually for thousands of its channels. Again, that’s in addition to other royalty fees. (The site, like most others, already pays songwriter royalties to performing rights organizations BMI, ASCAP and SESAC.)

Live365 did not respond to e-mail and phone queries from Wired News in time for publication, and Yahoo declined to comment. SoundExchange also failed to respond.

Hanson, who testified at the hearings on behalf of small webcasters, said he doesn’t “think the people actually running the record labels want to see internet radio shut down,” but that SoundExchange’s lawyers had planned “an aggressive, win-all-you-can battle in Washington. I think they were more successful than they expected to be.”

Pandora’s Joe Kennedy believes the board’s decision will not stand — it’s simply too extreme. He wrote to Wired News, “The only reason the (online streaming) services are not shutting down today is the belief that rationality will ultimately prevail here, either through appeal or congressional intervention.” (A third option, according to Hanson, is that SoundExchange could choose to continue licensing music as a share of revenue, as it did before the Copyright Royalty Board decision.)

Only webcasters that were involved in the original Copyright Royalty Board decision-making process (Yahoo, AOL, Live365 and a few smaller webcasters including Radioio, Ultimate80s and Accuradio) will be able to file an appeal, and they have 15 days to do so.

The House Commerce Committee’s telecommunications subcommittee is holding a hearing on March 7 to hear testimony on the current and future radio industry. Witnesses will include Mel Karmazin from Sirius, Peter Smith from broadcaster Greater Media and Bob Kimball from RealNetworks.

If the new rates stick, online music fans may come to expect far less innovation, variety and quality when it comes to internet radio. Some industry experts fear that even more users could be driven to illicit services that pay no royalties or those that operate from other countries.

A little more info on SoundExchange, taken from the FAQ on their website :

Who
governs SoundExchange?

The SoundExchange Board of Directors oversees all operations of SoundExchange.
This board approves such things as the distribution methodology and
administrative expenses. It is comprised of one representative from
each of the major label groups (EMI Music Group, SONY BMG Music
Entertainment, Universal Music Group and Warner Music Group); independent
labels (Tommy Boy Entertainment, a large independent, and Matador Records,
a small independent); a designated executive from an independent label
association; a designated executive from the Recording Industry Association
of America (RIAA); and an equal number of artists and artist representatives
from such organizations as AFTRA, AFM, the Recording
Academy, Music Manager’s Forum – U.S. and the Future of Music Coalition.
For a full board member listing, click
here
.

When was SoundExchange founded?
Before its spin-off in September of 2003 as an independent organization, SoundExchange was originally created in 2000 as an unincorporated division of the RIAA.

I’m already a member of ASCAP, BMI or SESAC. Don’t they cover this for me? What is the difference?
No. ASCAP, BMI and SESAC represent a different copyright than SoundExchange. ASCAP, BMI and SESAC collect performance revenue for the owners of the copyrighted musical work (the song), i.e. music publishers, songwriters and composers. SoundExchange collects performance revenue for owners of the sound recording copyright (the recording) and for featured and nonfeatured artists. SoundExchange, therefore, performs a different function and does not compete with ASCAP, BMI or SESAC. In fact, a company with both publishing (“song”) copyrights and recording copyrights should join collecting societies administering both types of rights: one for the song and another for the sound recording copyright.

And, a list of the SoundExchange Board includes :

SoundExchange Board

Alasdair McMullan
– EMI
Andrea Finkelstein – Sony BMG
Cary Sherman – RIAA

Daryl P. Friedman
– Recording Academy*
Dick Huey – Matador Records*
Don Rose – American Association of Independent Music

Jay L. Cooper, Esq.
– Recording Artists’ Coalition (RAC)*
Jay Rosenthal, Esq. – RAC*
Kim Roberts Hedgpeth – AFTRA
Michael Hausman

Michael Ostroff
– UMG
Patricia Polach – AFM

Patrick Rains

Paul Robinson
– WMG
Perry Resnick – Music Manager’s Forum-U.S.*
Steven M. Marks – RIAA*

Tom Silverman
– Tommy Boy Entertainment LLC*
Walter F. McDonough, Esq. – Future of Music Coalition
(FMC)*

*For identification purposes
only

One last thing from SoundExchange, their page on Licensing 101 is very valuable for webcasters. It spells out what a webcaster needs to do in order to obtain licenses and pay royalties….

If you would like to read a more detailed article from a legal standpoint, discussing exactly what and who this decision covers, what is financially expected between now and the appeal, and how the new royalty rates were created, and how they are intended to be distributed between the artists and the copyright holder (record company usually) please see the broadcast law blog.

2 great resources for everyone affected by the CRB and the royalty rates – legal guides in PDF form :


INTERNET RADIO: THE BASICS OF YOUR MUSIC ROYALTY OBLIGATIONS

Copyright Royalty Board Announces Music Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements for Internet Streaming

If you have any trouble loading those links, try the IWA page that they came from. These legal guides are offered free to all from the Internet Webcasting Association, courtesy of David Oxenford and Davis Wright Tremaine. The IWA website states :

For more information or questions about these or other legal issues related to streaming, please contact David Oxenford.

Contact Info:
David Oxenford David D. Oxenford
Washington, D.C.
(202) 508-6656
davidoxenford@dwt.com

These advisories are publications of the Broadcast Group of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP. Our purpose in publishing these advisories is to inform our clients and friends of recent developments in the broadcasting industry. They are not intended, nor should they be used, as a substitute for specific legal advice as legal counsel may only be given in response to inquiries regarding particular situations.

Both Attached Documents are Copyright © 2006 | Davis Wright Tremaine LLP

Posted in +Greatest Hits+, activism, CRB, dj, DRM, industry, internet, legal, music, news, piracy, radio, RIAA | 2 Comments »

RetroActive Payments? Pay Per Play gone mad.

Posted by Molli Fire on Friday, 2March07

Saw this piece on Hypebot. It discusses song plays on Internet Radio incurring fees retroactively to the beginning of 2006. How can that be fair? If radio broadcasters knew the price per play, isn’t it conceivable that they might have made different choices based on these new prices?
First, here is the article that best sums up the situation from hypebot :

Bad News For Net Broadcasting: Royalty Rates Jump.

It’s a sad day for fans of music on the internet and the creative broadcasters who program it.
Soundexchange_1
The US Copyright Royalty Board has announced new Internet radio royalty rates rejecting the arguments made by webcasters and adopting the “per play” rate requested by digital royalty collection agency SoundExchange. Retroactively through the beginning of 2006 the rates are:

* 2006 – $.0008 per play
* 2007 – $.0011 per play
* 2008 – $.0014 per play
* 2009 – $.0018 per play
* 2010 – $.0019 per play

Radio_10 An analysis from the experts at Kurt Hansen’s Radio And Internet Newsletter concludes, “In 2006, a well-run Internet radio station might have been able to sell two radio spots an hour at a $3 net CPM (cost-per-thousand), which would add up to .6 cents per listener-hour. Even adding in ancillary revenues from occasional video gateway ads, banner ads on the website, and so forth, total revenues per listener-hour would only be in the 1.0 to 1.2 cents per listener-hour range.”

“That math suggests that the royalty rate decision – for the performance alone, not even including composers’ royalties! – is in the in the ballpark of 100% or more of total revenues.”

The link to the Radio and Internet Newsletter link will take you to a detailed and indepth discussion of this deal.

There are plenty of radio and internet broadcasters in this audience, what do you think about this, and how is this affecting you? I am particularly concerned about broadcasting that was ad-free and not generating nearly as much income as this will cost them.

Posted in dj, DRM, internet, legal, music, news, piracy, radio | Leave a Comment »